Archive for the ‘Pet’ Category

Puppy Training Classes

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019
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Puppy Training Classes

Kissimmee Valley Feed and All-Star Mutts are now hosting puppy training classes on Saturdays. Open to puppies between the ages of 8 and 20 weeks. Puppies must have proof of vaccinations and should arrive on a leash with a collar. Be sure to bring some of their favorite treats!

The puppy training classes will focus on structured socialization, foundation behaviors, everyday life behaviors, confidence building, and making vet visits fun.

Class times are 10:00 am to 11:00 am on Saturdays. Cost is $10 per class. Sign up at the feed store. Classes are inside Kissimmee Valley Feed and space will be limited.

To find out more information please call the store at 407-892-4040. Store address: Kissimmee Valley Feed, 215 13th Street, St. Cloud, FL 34769

 

 

Pet Dental Month Savings

Sunday, January 27th, 2019
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Check out the Pet Dental Month Savings at  Kissimmee Valley Feed  February 1-28, 2019. Save 10% off specials on all of our dental supplies for dogs and cats at our second store location.

Kissimmee Valley Feed
215 13th Street
St. Cloud, FL 34769
Phone: 407-892-4040

Some of the sale items include:

Tropiclean water additive
Nutri Vet Toothpaste and toothbrushes
Tropiclean Dental Chews
Whimzees

According to the AVMA, dental health is a very important part of your pet’s overall health, and dental problems can cause, or be caused by, other health problems. Your pet’s teeth and gums should be checked at least once a year by your veterinarian to check for early signs of a problem and to keep your pet’s mouth healthy.

Oral health in dogs and cats

Your pet’s teeth should be checked at least once a year by your veterinarian for early signs of a problem and to keep your pet’s mouth healthy.

Have your pet’s teeth checked sooner if you observe any of the following problems:

  • bad breath
  • broken or loose teeth
  • extra teeth or retained baby teeth
  • teeth that are discolored or covered in tartar
  • abnormal chewing, drooling, or dropping food from the mouth
  • reduced appetite or refusal to eat
  • pain in or around the mouth
  • bleeding from the mouth
  • swelling in the areas surrounding the mouth

Some pets become irritable when they have dental problems, and any changes in your pet’s behavior should prompt a visit to your veterinarian. Always be careful when evaluating your pet’s mouth, because a painful animal may bite.

Causes of pet dental problems

Although cavities are less common in pets than in people, they can have many of the same dental problems that people can develop:

  • broken teeth and roots
  • periodontal disease
  • abscesses or infected teeth
  • cysts or tumors in the mouth
  • malocclusion, or misalignment of the teeth and bite
  • broken (fractured) jaw
  • palate defects (such as cleft palate)

Find out more here. 

Thanksgiving Safety Tips for Pets

Saturday, October 20th, 2018

Thanksgiving Safety Tips for Pets

The winter holidays can be fun for the whole family, but let’s make sure it’s not a dangerous time for your pet. Thanksgiving centers around food, so here are a few Thanksgiving safety tips to protect your pet and avoid a visit to the veterinarian.

 Cut the fat:

Fatty or rich foods like beef fat, poultry skin and gravy can cause severe gastrointestinal issues in pets, including:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive gas
  • Serious diseases like pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is a severe inflammation of the pancreas, an organ that produces digestive enzymes. On the mild side, pancreatitis can cause vomiting and a decrease in appetite, but can potentially be fatal.

If you want to treat your pet, it’s best to stick to a pet treat or a couple of small bites of lean poultry or unsalted/unbuttered vegetables.

Bones are bad:

Although bones from our holiday birds look good to pets, they are dangerous and can cause intestinal upset and may even splinter once digested.

Watch the packaging:

Make sure you dispose of any turkey or other food packaging quickly and appropriately.

All strings, plastic holders and bags that have a meat smell to them can be very attractive to a pet. Once ingested, these items can cause damage or blockage of the intestines.

Chocolate is particularly toxic:

Consider all the cookie and desserts offered during the holidays, many of which contain chocolate.

Chocolate is dangerous for dogs in particular because it contains theobromine, a caffeine-like ingredient that can be toxic to your pet. Dogs are not able to metabolize theobromine as quickly as humans. Complications include:

  • Digestive issues
  • Dehydration
  • Excitability
  • Slow heart rate

Later stages of theobromine poisoning include epileptic-like seizures and death. Keep your pet away from dark, semi-sweet and baker’s chocolate because they contain higher levels of theobromine.

Source: Banfield

A Guide to Pet Halloween Safety

Wednesday, September 26th, 2018

A Guide to Pet Halloween SafetyHalloween is a fun day for families, but it can be a stressful or even dangerous day for pets. In order to make it an enjoyable and safe experience for pets, here is a few pet Halloween safety tips to keep in mind.

Choose pet costumes wisely
If your pet enjoys being dressed up, be sure the costume isn’t constricting, unsafe or annoying. This can add stress to your pet. Be wary of costumes that use rubber bands to keep them in place because your pet could chew them off and swallow them, potentially creating a choking hazard or causing an intestinal injury. The bands can also become embedded into your pet’s flesh, causing pain or discomfort. Make sure the costume doesn’t obstruct your pet’s vision. Even the gentlest pets can get snappy when they can’t see what’s going on.

Keep pets away from the front door
Keep your pet in a separate room during trick-or-treat hours. The continuous opening/closing of the door, the ringing of doorbells, and general noise associated with groups of people approaching the house can be stressful or confusing to pets. Dogs may feel the need to protect their home and humans and may bite your bizarre-looking visitors. Your pet may also become frightened and dart through the open door.

Keep your pet inside
There are plenty of stories of vicious pranksters who have teased, injured, stolen or even killed pets that were left in their yards or allowed to roam outside on Halloween.

Be careful with candles and lit pumpkins
Pets are attracted to bright lights in a darkened room. Candles can be knocked over easily, spilling hot wax on furniture and carpet and potentially causing a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting badly burned.

Do not leave your pet in the car while the kids go trick-or-treating
Pets may find it very frightening to sit in a dark car while scary creatures of every size and shape walk by. Furthermore, your normally friendly pet can become aggressive and protective and lash out at a friendly ghost or witch. For the safety of your pets, leave them at home, inside where they are safe.

Do not give your pet candy
Chocolate contains theobromine, a substance that can be poisonous to your pet. Dark, semi-sweet or baker’s chocolate can be lethal if ingested. Sticks on caramel apples can be swallowed and cause choking or damage to internal organs. Candy can upset the stomach, resulting in diarrhea or vomiting. Packaging can cause a choking hazard or intestinal blockage. Foil wrappers can become as dangerous as razors when swallowed. In short, be sure to keep all of these tempting treats away from your pets.

Source: Banfield

 

Protect Pets from Summer Heat

Thursday, July 12th, 2018

Protect Pets from Summer HeatTemperatures are soaring into the 90s and 100s and such intense heat is not only dangerous for humans but for pets as well. The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) offers a few tips to protect pets during summer heat waves.

Cars are potential death traps during the hot summer months because inside temperatures can quickly climb to more than 120 degrees Fahrenheit on even a mild sunny day. It’s best to leave your pet at home while running errands during hot weather. If you absolutely must leave your pet in a car, please do the following:

  • Open windows and vents as wide as possible without providing an escape route; or, put your pet in a well-ventilated cage inside the car and open the windows fully.
  • Provide fresh water.
  • Check the car every 10 minutes.
  • If your pet is panting, has a staring or anxious expression, does not obey commands, has warm, dry skin and a high fever, rapid heartbeat, or is vomiting, lower the body temperature quickly with cool water – either by immersion or by spraying thoroughly with a garden hose. Call your veterinarian immediately.
  • If your pet lives outdoors, make sure there is adequate shelter for protection from the midday sun and heat. Outdoor kennels should be well-ventilated and in a shaded area. There should always be some shade for the pet to get out of the sun.
  • Also, make sure there is plenty of fresh drinking water available to your pet. The bowl should be placed in a shaded area where it cannot be heated by the sun.
  • Exercise is important, but overexertion during hot weather commonly causes heat stress. Avoid excessive exercise during hot days.
  • And, keep your pet well-groomed. Long hair and hair mats may need to be clipped to help cool the animal.

Source: Sand Road Animal Hospital

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Quick Info

Our Location
1501 Eastern Ave map
Saint Cloud, FL 34769..

Contact Info
Phone: 407-957-4100
Fax: 407-957-0450

Store Hours
Mon-Fri: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sat: 8:00 am - 2:00 pm
Sunday Closed