Archive for the ‘Pet’ Category

The Nutritional Needs of Large and Giant Dog Breeds

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2021

It’s no surprise that any dog extraordinary in size and stature has unique dietary needs. But those precise needs might look different than you’d imagine.

In order to ensure your dog can perform at its peak, it’s important to choose a recipe that matches their breed size.

Large breeds, classified as dogs who weigh between 51 and 90 pounds as full-grown adults, include German Shepherds, Bernese Mountain Dogs, and Great Danes, among many others. Dogs that weigh over 90 pounds at maturity are often considered giant breeds. Included in this designation are the St. Bernard, Newfoundland, and the Giant Mastiff.

Throughout all life stages, large and giant breed dogs have different nutritional requirements compared to small and medium breeds.

As puppies, bigger breeds grow quicker and over a longer period of time. As such, large breed puppy diets should contain lower levels of energy and protein. With the wrong type of food, large and giant breeds will grow faster than their bones can support them, causing orthopedic issues. Furthermore, bones that grow too fast are less dense and can lead to long-term issues.

For example, if large and giant breed puppies have a diet with a protein/fat ratio of 30/20, they could have excess levels of calcium and phosphorous. They are essential in certain quantities, but too much of these will negatively affect bone and joint development. This could potentially lead to bone disease and other orthopedic problems later on in life.

Instead, choose a recipe like Nutrena’s Puppy Large Breed Chicken & Brown Rice Recipe. It has a protein/fat ratio of 26/14 and optimal levels of calcium and phosphorous to support a slower growth rate so that their skeleton has time to develop enough strength to support their greater weight. Our Puppy Large Breed Recipe also contains natural sources of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate which support healthy joints.

While some small breed puppies are fully grown at nine months, it can take up to 18 to 24 months for large and giant breeds to mature. You’ll need to keep your larger breed dogs on puppy food longer than your small and medium breeds.

Weight management, joint health help large breed adults achieve longevity.

As dogs mature, nutritional concerns shift to weight management and joint health. As the dietary differences remain between small and large breeds into adulthood, the path to get there is also different.

Compared to smaller breeds, large breeds require fewer calories per pound, so they need a less nutrient and energy dense diet. Thus, these larger breeds need recipes with lower amounts of energy.

It’s especially important for joint health and longevity that they consume a recipe that meets their needs. The wrong balance can create weight management issues which could affect your dog’s health and longevity. Overweight adult dogs can develop a number of health issues including joint problems, osteoarthritis, diabetes, among many others. In addition, look for a recipe that has L-carnitine to help burn fat and support a healthy weight, and includes Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate which helps support joint health.

Whether your large breed is young or old, protecting livestock, herding, or doing a little bit of everything, they need a diet that helps them perform at their best.

This post was originally published at nutrinaworld.com.

Dog Training Tips

Tuesday, January 26th, 2021

When you bring a puppy or even an adult dog home for the first time, the idea of training probably means potty training. But after they chew up that pair of shoes and run-away off leash for the first time, you realize there is a bit more training you need to do. Here are a few things to consider when training your puppy or adult dog:

  1. Establish house rules for the dog.  Just like your children have house rules so should your dog. Will you allow your dog on the couch when you are binging Netflix? Will they be allowed to sleep with you on the bed or in the crate in another room? It’s important to establish rules for the puppy or adult dog before they arrive so that everyone and your furry friend know what to expect.
  2. Find a Training Class.  Most dog owners find puppy training classes a good idea. Depending on where you live, classes are typically held at a local dog training facility or pet supply store. There is a fee associated with these class so make sure to research the trainer before you register to ensure they have experience and excellent references. In the class, your puppy will typically learn basic commands such as sit, lie down, come, and stay and how to walk on leash.
  3. Start socializing early.  When you bring home your puppy or adopted dog, getting them use to their surroundings and interacting with people is an important part of the training process. In some areas, you can even sign up for a puppy socialization class to help your puppy learn how to interact with other dogs and people. It’s important to do this as soon as possible to avoid any set-in fears and anxieties. If you have an adopted dog, you can socialize with frequent walks around the neighborhood, having people over, and taking them to a dog park.
  4. Reward good behavior. When your puppy or adult dog does the right thing, treats and praise help reinforce the behavior you expect. Dogs are people pleasers and want to please their owners. Positive praise helps build trust between you and your furry friend and ensures they develop into a confident, well-adjusted dog.
  5. Be patient. It can take three to four weeks of consistent training before it becomes a habit. With puppies, you need to exercise patience during the training process by implementing short training sessions every day. If you are bringing home an adult dog, they can be easier to train than young puppies as they can focus for a longer period to time.
  6. Give daily exerciseA bored dog tends to get itself into trouble. Daily exercise not only keeps your furry friend healthy but also helps provide needed mental stimulation while reducing common behavioral problems such as chewing, digging, and barking.  

This article originally appeared on nutrinaworld.com.

Self Serve Pet Wash July Savings

Tuesday, June 16th, 2020

Looking for a self serve pet wash station? Does your dog need a bath?pet wash

Come by Kissimmee Valley Feed for the month of July and save $2 off on our climate-controlled self serve pet wash station. BYOD (bring your own dog) or bring in your pets, large or small and make bath time simpler. Price is just $8 from July 1st-July 31st, including shampoo, rinse, and blow-dry. Towels and gloves are provided too at no extra cost! To help prevent the wet doggie smell, take advantage of our self serve dryer. The grooming table allows you to brush out your dog or pet, so they are tangle-free. Best of all, we clean up the mess for you!

The pet wash station takes cash or credit cards and is available during business hours. If your pets need a wash, come see us! Also, take advantage of our new punch cards. Each time you stop in and utilize our self serve pet wash station, you will be credited for your visit. Once you fill up your card make sure you let an associate know and receive a special goodie! So beat the heat this summer and stop in for a washing session at a discounted price for the month of July!

You’ll find Kissimmee Valley Feed pet wash station inside store number 2, 215 13th Street, St. Cloud, FL 34769. Phone: Phone: 407-892-4040.

Pet Dental Month Savings

Monday, January 27th, 2020
Feb ’20Feb
129

Check out the Pet Dental Month Savings at  Kissimmee Valley Feed going on throughout February 2020. Save 10% off specials on all of our dental supplies for dogs and cats at our second store location.

Kissimmee Valley Feed
215 13th Street
St. Cloud, FL 34769
Phone: 407-892-4040

Some of the sale items include:

Tropiclean water additive
Nutri Vet Toothpaste and toothbrushes
Tropiclean Dental Chews
Whimzees

According to the AVMA, dental health is a very important part of your pet’s overall health, and dental problems can cause, or be caused by, other health problems. Your pet’s teeth and gums should be checked at least once a year by your veterinarian to check for early signs of a problem and to keep your pet’s mouth healthy.

Oral health in dogs and cats

Your pet’s teeth should be checked at least once a year by your veterinarian for early signs of a problem and to keep your pet’s mouth healthy.

Have your pet’s teeth checked sooner if you observe any of the following problems:

  • bad breath
  • broken or loose teeth
  • extra teeth or retained baby teeth
  • teeth that are discolored or covered in tartar
  • abnormal chewing, drooling, or dropping food from the mouth
  • reduced appetite or refusal to eat
  • pain in or around the mouth
  • bleeding from the mouth
  • swelling in the areas surrounding the mouth

Some pets become irritable when they have dental problems, and any changes in your pet’s behavior should prompt a visit to your veterinarian. Always be careful when evaluating your pet’s mouth, because a painful animal may bite.

Causes of pet dental problems

Although cavities are less common in pets than in people, they can have many of the same dental problems that people can develop:

  • broken teeth and roots
  • periodontal disease
  • abscesses or infected teeth
  • cysts or tumors in the mouth
  • malocclusion, or misalignment of the teeth and bite
  • broken (fractured) jaw
  • palate defects (such as cleft palate)

Find out more here. 

Thanksgiving Safety Tips for Pets

Sunday, October 20th, 2019

Thanksgiving Safety Tips for PetsKeep in mind these Thanksgiving safety tips for pets during the holidays. Let’s make sure it’s not a dangerous time for your furry friend! Enjoy time with your family and avoid a visit to your veterinarian by following this guide:

 Cut the fat:

Fatty or rich foods like beef fat, poultry skin, and gravy can cause severe gastrointestinal issues in pets, including:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive gas
  • Serious diseases like pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is a severe inflammation of the pancreas, an organ that produces digestive enzymes. On the mild side, pancreatitis can cause vomiting and a decrease in appetite, but can potentially be fatal.

If you want to treat your pet, it’s best to stick to a pet treat or a couple of small bites of lean poultry or unsalted/unbuttered vegetables.

Bones are bad:

Although bones from our holiday birds look good to pets, they are dangerous and can cause intestinal upset and may even splinter once digested.

Watch the packaging:

Make sure you dispose of any turkey or other food packaging quickly and appropriately.

All strings, plastic holders and bags that have a meat smell to them can be very attractive to a pet. Once ingested, these items can cause damage or blockage of the intestines.

Chocolate is particularly toxic:

Consider all the cookie and desserts offered during the holidays, many of which contain chocolate.

Chocolate is dangerous for dogs in particular because it contains theobromine, a caffeine-like ingredient that can be toxic to your pet. Dogs are not able to metabolize theobromine as quickly as humans. Complications include:

  • Digestive issues
  • Dehydration
  • Excitability
  • Slow heart rate

Later stages of theobromine poisoning include epileptic-like seizures and death. Keep your pet away from dark, semi-sweet and baker’s chocolate because they contain higher levels of theobromine.

We hope these Thanksgiving safety tips for pets were helpful!

Source: Banfield

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