Archive for the ‘Pet’ Category

July 4th Pet Safety Tips

Thursday, June 23rd, 2022

Follow these July 4th Pet Safety Tips for a safe and successful holiday celebration. Did you know that more pets go missing over the Fourth of July weekend than any other time of the year?

 July 4th Pet Safety Tips

Cats

  • Keep your cat indoors.
    Close all windows and curtains and switch on music or the television to drown out the noise.
  • Leave your cat to take refuge in a corner if it wishes. Do not try to tempt it out as this could cause more stress.
  • Microchip your cat. Ensure it can be returned to you.

Dogs

  • Exercise your dog during the day.
  • Never walk your dog during fireworks.
  • Keep your dog indoors, close the curtains and play music to drown out the noise.
  • Let your dog hide if it wants to take refuge under furniture or in a corner.
  • Make sure your dog is wearing a collar and tag and is microchipped. In addition, they are wearing identification tags in case it bolts and becomes lost.
  • Keep dogs leashed if you take them outside the home.
  • Use caution when in or around crowds or people your dog doesn’t know
  • Remember, dogs get very excited during horseplay in and out of the water and have a tendency to bite when excited.
  • Use caution when picnicking and barbecuing. Many small children are bitten while walking around with food in their hands.
  • Protect your dog from other dogs that may be loose, keep them at a distance, many bites occur while animal owners are trying to break up a dog fight.
  • If it is hot, give your pet lots of water – indoors or out
  • Never leave your dog locked in cars – the hot summer sun can raise temperatures to 120 degrees inside your car, even with windows rolled down.
  • Prevent sunburns – keep four-legged friends out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., peak skin damaging hours. Otherwise rub sunblock on unprotected areas such as the skin around lips and tips of noses and ears, especially on fair-colored pets.
  • Provide plenty of shelter. Do not leave animals alone outside on hot days, even in the shade. Shade moves throughout the day. Keep pets under a cool shelter or inside during peak hours when possible.
  • Watch out for heatstroke – symptoms of pet heatstroke include panting, staring, high fever, rapid heartbeat, vomiting, collapse, and disobedience, among others. Call a veterinarian immediately. Apply water-soaked towels to hairless areas of the animal’s body to lower its temperature.
  • If you go hiking, pack supplies for your dog as you would for yourself on long hikes – bring extra food and water for your dog on long walks as well as an emergency first aid kit.
  • Keep your pets on their normal diet. Any change, even for one meal, can give your pet severe indigestion and diarrhea.
  • Use caution with open flames and fireworks as pets may be burned or could chase the fireworks and become injured.
  • A simple plug-in diffuser that dispenses a dog appeasing pheromone into the room is available at some veterinary practices.
  • Vets prescribe sedatives.
  • Never leave alcoholic drinks unattended where pets can reach them.
  • Do not put glow jewelry on your pets, or allow them to play with it.

Small animals

  • Small animals – such as rabbits and guinea pigs – living outside should not be forgotten. They can also become very stressed by the loud noise. Bring small animals indoors or into an outhouse or garden shed to give them extra protection
  • Where the hutch must remain outside cover it in an old thick blanket. This will block out a lot of the light and sound.
  • Whether indoors or outdoors ensure your pets have plenty of extra bedding material to hide in and feel more secure.

Horses

  • Play the radio for them three days BEFORE firework night. Leave the radio on to distract them on the night itself.
  • If you have stable lights, leave them on and they’ll make the firework flashes less extreme.
  • Don’t even think of riding out – yes, people do!
  • If you leave them out, check fences and gates first. Then keep out of the way and just watch from a distance.
  • Try putting cotton wool balls in your horse’s ears but again practice in advance. It’s no good waiting until the bangs start to decide to give it a try.
  • If you do stable your horse, arrange for him/her to be brought in before the end of the school day when bangs are likely to start. You don’t want to be leading when they get a fright.
  • Make sure they have plenty of hay to keep them occupied.
  • If you can keep calm during the bangs and flashes then hang around the stables or go regularly to check them. If you’re likely to be scared/angry, etc yourself, be in the immediate area by all means but keep away from the horses or you’ll only make them worse.
  • DON’T go in the stable with a horse once the fireworks start. I don’t care how calm they seem to be – it just takes an instant for them to change from your cuddly horse to a wild animal that has reverted to survival mode.
  • Never light fireworks near barns or fields, as it is an extreme fire hazard. Fireworks frighten horses. They’ll sometimes run through fences and become lost or injured. They can also injure people when they are startled by the lights and noise.

We hope these July 4th Pet Safety Tips are helpful! Please visit Kissimmee Valley Feed for all your pet needs.

Spring Garden Hazards

Wednesday, March 30th, 2022

Spring Garden HazardsSpring Garden Hazards: As spring arrives and the first buds appear, gardening can be a relaxing and healthy way to pass the time.  But it can also pose some potential risks to our cat and dog friends. With care and some knowledge, these risks can be avoided.  Here is a list of potential spring garden hazards.

Fertilizers and Pesticides:

Fertilizers containing blood meal, bone meal, feather meal or iron can be tasty for dogs and particularly dangerous. Ingestion of large amounts of meal containing products can form concretions in the stomach resulting in obstruction and severe pancreatitis.  Likewise, those containing iron can lead to iron poisoning causing vomiting, bloody diarrhea, lethargy, abdominal pain, shock, tremors, and potential cardiac and liver effects.  Consider using natural fertilizers available many garden supply stores or local farms.  Ingestion of pesticides or insecticides containing organophosphates can be life threatening even in small amounts.

Mulch:

Cocoa mulch is made from the discarded shells and hulls of the cocoa bean.  Its chocolate like smell can be particularly attractive to dogs. Similarly, like chocolate, this mulch contains theobromine and caffeine.  The amount of toxin present can vary from product to product.  Symptoms of toxicity include vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, seizures and in extreme cases, death.  Keep pets safe by closely supervising them or using safer alternatives to cocoa mulch.  They include rubber mulch, cedar mulch, leaves, pine needles or untreated wood chips.  While these are safer alternatives, please remember these can still be ingested and cause an obstruction.

Compost:

Gardeners love compost for its nutrient value and many have their own pile.  Compost can be toxic to pets and wildlife and should always be fenced off.  As organic matter decomposes in the compost pile, molds can grow.  Consequently, these molds can produce tremorgenic mycotoxins.  As a result, when ingested symptoms can occur within 30 minutes and include agitation, panting, drooling, vomiting, tremors, and seizures.  However, with supportive care the prognosis is good.

Snail and Slug Bates:

These are available in pellets, granules, powder or liquid.  Most contain metaldehyde which is very dangerous to dogs and cats.  As a result, symptoms can occur within 1-2 hours of ingestion and include salivation, restlessness, vomiting, tremors, seizures and increase body temperature.  Without veterinary care the symptoms can last for days and be fatal, for instance.  Gopher, mole and other vermin bates contain strychnine and are highly toxic.

Flowers and Plants: 

Many plants can be toxic to pets.  Some can have only mild symptoms of gastrointestinal upset to severe liver or kidney failure and death.  For example, the following is an incomplete list of common plants.

  • Severe toxicity:  Sego palm, Azalea/Rhododendron, Caster bean, Cyclamen, Oleander and Yew.
  • Moderate Toxicity:  Aloe Vera, Amaryllis, Begonia, Chrysanthemum, Daffodil, Hosta, Morning glory and Poinsettia.
  • Mild toxicity:  Baby’s breath, Carnation, Gladiola and Tomato plant.

Citronella candles:

Ingestion of citronella candles, used to deter mosquitos, can cause gastrointestinal inflammation including vomiting and diarrhea.

Above all, if you think your pet has ingested a toxic substance, contact your veterinarian for advice and treatment.  Additionally, you can contact the ASPCA Hotline at 1-888-426-4435 or the Pet Poison Hotline at 1-800-213-6680.  Both charge a fee for their service.  Several pet poison apps are available, as well.

In conclusion, contact or visit Kissimmee Valley Feed for natural lawn and garden products.

Article provided by Nutrena.

New Redbarn Whole Grain Dry Dog Food

Wednesday, February 16th, 2022

Redbarn Whole Grain Land Recipe Dog Food Redbarn Whole Grain Sky Recipe Dog Food Redbarn Whole Grain Ocean Recipe Dog FoodNew Redbarn Whole Grain Dry Dog Food: Store #2 welcomes Redbarn’s Whole Grain Dry Dog Food to our shelves! We now carry all three of their products.

Click on each product to learn more about their individual qualities. If your dog loves meat, they’ll love Redbarn’s Whole Grain Dry Dog Food. The first FIVE ingredients in all three recipes are meat, fish, or poultry, depending on the recipe. Animal protein is the best source of protein for our pups, and these Whole Grain recipes will help support your dog’s overall health, wellness, and longevity into their senior years.

The goodness doesn’t stop there— each scoop of dry food contains carefully selected functional ingredients. Omega 6 and 3 fatty acids from salmon oil and flaxseed help support healthy skin and a beautiful, shiny coat; prebiotics and probiotics support healthy digestion; and guaranteed levels of taurine, l-carnitine, and methionine support heart health. It’s your dog’s new, well-balanced nutrition plan in a few convenient scoops!

For over 25 years, Redbarn Pet Products has been a family-owned business, growing into your trusted leader in treats, chews, and food. From then through now, Redbarn’s commitment to pet parents is simple: to cook food made with clean ingredients to support the health and wellness of your dog. It’s food we all feel good about.

These products are available at Store #2, located at 215 13th Street, St. Cloud, FL 34769. Contact us at 407-892-4040 with any questions! Visit us Mon-Fri: 9:00 am – 7:00 pm or Sat: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm to check out the new selections for yourself.

Valentine’s Day Pet Safety Tips

Monday, January 31st, 2022

Valentine’s Day Pet Safety TipsValentine’s Day Pet Safety Tips: Each year our poison control experts see a rise in cases around February 14, many involving chocolate or lilies, a flower that’s potentially fatal to cats. Valentine’s Day can be as much fun for pets as it is for humans—as long as dangerous items are kept out of paws’ reach!

Pet-Safe Bouquets

When sending a floral arrangement to someone with a cat, specify that it contain no lilies—and when receiving an arrangement, sift through and remove all dangerous flora. If your pet is suffering from symptoms such as lethargy, vomiting or diarrhea, he may have ingested an offending flower or plant. Use our online toxic and nontoxic plant libraries as visual guides of what shouldn’t be in your bouquets.

Forbidden Chocolate

Seasoned pet lovers know that all types of chocolate are potentially life-threatening when ingested by pets. Methylxanthines are caffeine-like stimulants that affect gastrointestinal, neurologic and cardiac function. They can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, seizures and an abnormally elevated heart rate. The high-fat content in lighter chocolates can potentially lead to a life-threatening inflammation of the pancreas. Go ahead and indulge, but don’t leave chocolate out for chowhounds to find.

Careful with Cocktails

Spilled wine, a half a glass of champagne or some leftover liquor are nothing to cry over until a curious pet laps them up. Because animals are smaller than humans, a little bit of alcohol can do a lot of harm, causing vomiting, diarrhea, lack of coordination, central nervous system depression, tremors, difficulty breathing, metabolic disturbances and even coma. Potentially fatal respiratory failure can also occur if a large amount is ingested.

Life Is Sweet

So don’t let pets near treats sweetened with xylitol. If ingested, gum, candy and other treats that include this sweetener can result in hypoglycemia (a sudden drop in blood sugar). This can cause your pet to suffer depression, loss of coordination and seizures.

Every Rose Has Its Thorn

Don’t let pets near roses or other thorny-stemmed flowers. Biting, stepping on or swallowing their sharp, woody spines can cause serious infection if a puncture occurs. De-thorn your roses far away from pets.

Playing with Fire

It’s nice to set your evening a-glow with candlelight, but put out the fire when you leave the room. Pawing kittens and nosy pooches can burn themselves or cause a fire by knocking over unattended candles.

Wrap It Up

Gather up tape, ribbons, bows, wrapping paper, cellophane and balloons after presents have been opened—if swallowed, these long, stringy and “fun-to-chew” items can get lodged in your pet’s throat or digestive tract, causing her to choke or vomit.

The Furry Gift of Life?

Giving a cuddly puppy or kitten may seem a fitting Valentine’s Day gift—however, returning a pet you hadn’t planned on is anything but romantic. Companion animals bring with them a lifelong commitment, and choosing a pet for someone else doesn’t always turn out right. Check your local animal care shelter or take a romantic trip to the shelter together.

In conclusion, visit Kissimmee Valley Feed for more Valentine’s Day Pet Safety Tips (and gifts!)

How a Proper Diet Can Benefit Your Dog’s Sensitive Skin & Coat

Thursday, January 27th, 2022

How a Proper Diet Can Benefit Your Dog’s Sensitive Skin & CoatHow a Proper Diet Can Benefit Your Dog’s Sensitive Skin & Coat: Just like us, your pet’s skin and coat serve to protect them. Different irritants can affect your dog’s coating as seasons change turning it from vibrant, shiny, and soft to dull and dry. While the cooler months bring dry weather, the warmer months bring allergies and notorious heat. For you, that might mean taking an allergy pill, but it’s not the same for your dog.

One thing is inevitable: keeping your dog’s protective barrier strong and top of mind is essential for their health and happiness. With the proper diet, they can protect themselves all year round, and you can feel more at ease.

Meet Your Dog’s Skin Needs

An important factor in the health of your dog’s skin and coat is their diet. Alongside a regular visit to the groomers, checking for ticks, and regular brushing, feeding them the right nutrients will benefit their skin and coat.

Here are a few specific things to look out for in the nutrition label.

  • Animal-based protein should be the number one ingredient.
  • The proper balance of Omega-6 & Omega-3 fatty acids are integral for skin and coat health. It also helps reduce inflammation.
  • If your dog has a confirmed allergy to an ingredient such as chicken, corn, wheat or soy, look for a diet without those ingredients.

Factors that can affect your dog’s sensitive skin occur all year long. But, with the right recipe, your pet’s skin can protect them through all elements.

If you are consider switching your dog’s food, consult your veterinarian with any questions.

In conclusion, for more tips on How a Proper Diet Can Benefit Your Dog’s Sensitive Skin & Coat, visit Kissimmee Valley Feed. Check out our Pet Selection here.

Article Source: Nutrena’s Blog

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