Archive for the ‘News & Updates’ Category

Christmas Customer Appreciation Event

Monday, November 18th, 2019
Dec
14

Pictures with Santa at kissimmee Valley Feeds Christmas Customer Appreciation EventJoin Kissimmee Valley Feed Store #2 for our Christmas Customer Appreciation Event on Saturday, December 14, 2019.

This day-long event has something for everyone!

Grab your pet and kiddos and come for pictures with Santa. Santa stops in for a visit between 10:00 am and noon. No charge, but we ask you to consider making a donation.

Purchase a ticket for a chance to win gift baskets and prizes. Each ticket is $1.

All donations from the pet photo and gift baskets will go towards the Adopt a Senior Program. For every $30 collected a senior will receive a special meal and gift at the Council on Aging. Kissimmee Valley Feed will match all gift basket donations.

As thanks to our customers, take advantage of specials all day long:

  • $5 off dog food, 18 pounds or larger bags!
  • $3 off dog food, 17 pounds or smaller bags!
  • $3 off all Poultry Food!
  • Bulk dog treats: Buy one, get one Half Off!
  • 10% off all Christmas Toys & Treats!
  • 10% off Small Animal Supplies!
  • Special pricing on Kamado Grills!
  • Special pricing on Traeger Grills!
  • Special pricing on Yeti items!

Come shop Kissimmee Valley Feed’s Christmas Customer Appreciation event on December 14th!

Address: 215 13TH Street, St. Cloud FL 34769

Closed Thanksgiving Day!

Tuesday, October 29th, 2019
Nov
28

Thanksgiving DayThanksgiving Day is a celebration, giving thanks for the harvest and our many blessings from the past year. How does your family celebrate this holiday? 

Happy Thanksgiving from Kissimmee Valley Feed! We are thankful for our customers and this great community we call home!

Kissimmee Valley Feed is closed on Thursday, November 28, 2019, in observance of the holiday.  Our staff will be enjoying the day and be giving thanks for family & friends! We will resume normal business hours starting on Friday, November 29rd, 2018. Get your shopping done earlier in the week and avoid the rush of the holiday weekend!

Kissimmee Valley Feed wishes you and your family a wonderful Thanksgiving day!

Thanksgiving Safety Tips for Pets

Sunday, October 20th, 2019

Thanksgiving Safety Tips for PetsKeep in mind these Thanksgiving safety tips for pets during the holidays. Let’s make sure it’s not a dangerous time for your furry friend! Enjoy time with your family and avoid a visit to your veterinarian by following this guide:

 Cut the fat:

Fatty or rich foods like beef fat, poultry skin, and gravy can cause severe gastrointestinal issues in pets, including:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive gas
  • Serious diseases like pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is a severe inflammation of the pancreas, an organ that produces digestive enzymes. On the mild side, pancreatitis can cause vomiting and a decrease in appetite, but can potentially be fatal.

If you want to treat your pet, it’s best to stick to a pet treat or a couple of small bites of lean poultry or unsalted/unbuttered vegetables.

Bones are bad:

Although bones from our holiday birds look good to pets, they are dangerous and can cause intestinal upset and may even splinter once digested.

Watch the packaging:

Make sure you dispose of any turkey or other food packaging quickly and appropriately.

All strings, plastic holders and bags that have a meat smell to them can be very attractive to a pet. Once ingested, these items can cause damage or blockage of the intestines.

Chocolate is particularly toxic:

Consider all the cookie and desserts offered during the holidays, many of which contain chocolate.

Chocolate is dangerous for dogs in particular because it contains theobromine, a caffeine-like ingredient that can be toxic to your pet. Dogs are not able to metabolize theobromine as quickly as humans. Complications include:

  • Digestive issues
  • Dehydration
  • Excitability
  • Slow heart rate

Later stages of theobromine poisoning include epileptic-like seizures and death. Keep your pet away from dark, semi-sweet and baker’s chocolate because they contain higher levels of theobromine.

We hope these Thanksgiving safety tips for pets were helpful!

Source: Banfield

A Guide to Pet Halloween Safety

Sunday, October 20th, 2019

A Guide to Pet Halloween SafetyWe’re here to provide you with a Guide to Pet Halloween Safety! It’s a fun holiday for families, but it can be a stressful or even dangerous day for pets. In order to make it an enjoyable and safe experience for pets, here are a few pet Halloween suggestions to keep in mind.

Choose pet costumes wisely:

Be sure the costume isn’t constricting, unsafe or annoying. This can add stress to your pet. Be wary of costumes that use rubber bands to keep them in place because your pet could chew them off and swallow them. Make sure the costume doesn’t obstruct your pet’s vision. Even the gentlest pets can get snappy when they can’t see what’s going on.

Keep pets away from the front door

Keep your pet in a separate room during trick-or-treat hours. The continuous opening and closing of the door, the ringing of doorbells, and general noise associated with groups of people approaching the house can be stressful or confusing. Dogs may feel the need to protect their home and humans and may bite your bizarre-looking visitors. Your pet may also become frightened and dart through the open door.

Keep them inside:

There are plenty of stories of vicious pranksters who have teased, injured, stolen or even killed pets that were left in their yards or allowed to roam outside on Halloween.

Be careful with candles or lit pumpkins:

Pets are attracted to bright lights in a darkened room. Candles can be knocked over easily, spilling hot wax on furniture and carpet and potentially causing a fire. Curious kittens or puppies especially run the risk of getting badly burned.

Don’t leave them in the car: 

Pets may find it very frightening to sit in a dark car while scary creatures of every size and shape walk by. Furthermore, your normally friendly pet can become aggressive and protective and lash out at a friendly ghost or witch. For the safety of your pets, leave them at home, inside where they are safe.

Do not feed them candy:

Chocolate contains theobromine, a substance that can be poisonous to your pet. Dark, semi-sweet or baker’s chocolate can be lethal if ingested. Sticks on caramel apples can be swallowed and cause choking or damage internally. Candy can upset the stomach, resulting in diarrhea or vomiting. Foil wrappers can become as dangerous as razors when swallowed. In short, be sure to keep all of these tempting treats away from your pets.

Source: Banfield

Don’t set and forget self-fed cattle supplements

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

self-fed cattle supplements | Kissimmee Valley FeedBetter management of self-fed cattle supplements could improve consumption and optimize performance.

Self-fed supplements are commonly used to deliver essential nutrients to cattle and to meet their nutritional requirements. However, use of a self-fed supplement does not translate to a self-managed supplementation program. Proper management of self-fed supplements is important to achieve desired intake and cattle performance goals.

One of the biggest challenges producers face with self-fed supplements is consumption,” says Christina Hayes, Ph.D., beef product manager with Purina Animal Nutrition. “When intake isn’t within the expected range, cattle performance may suffer. For optimal performance, management of self-fed supplements is essential.”

Many things can influence consumption, from forage quality and amount to supplement location and water availability. But you can take steps to help manage supplements and optimize intake.

The first step to becoming a better supplement manager begins with measuring intake.

 

Determining Consumption

“Calculating consumption can help you get a baseline intake for your herd, which you can then compare to target intake levels for the supplement,” says Hayes. “If your herd’s intake is below or above target intake levels, then you know it’s time to make adjustments.”

The following calculation can help you measure herd intake:

(Pounds of supplement distributed / # of cattle) / # days supplement was available

When making this calculation, don’t forget that calves will consume some supplement as well.

“If a supplement is not being consumed at target intake levels, it’s time to start troubleshooting,” says Hayes. “What is the forage quality? Where is the feeder located? Have there been weather challenges? What is the overall feeding program?”

If consumption is a challenge, there are strategies you can implement to help achieve the desired intake.

 

Managing Supplements

Implementing some simple strategies can go a long way toward ideal supplement consumption.

Here are a few tips:

  • Look for a high-quality supplement that includes protein, energy, calcium, phosphorus and trace minerals
  • It is best to start supplementing early to ensure cattle requirements are being met. If you wait too long to supplement and cows have to play nutritional catch-up, you may experience supplement overconsumption.
  • Initially, place supplements near a water source or in loafing or grazing areas. Cattle frequently visit those spots, giving them more opportunity to consume as they adjust to using the supplements. As the cattle become more comfortable with supplements, you can gradually move supplements further from those areas to entice them to graze underutilized pasture.
  • Ensure fresh, cool water is available, preferably in the shade during the warm, summer months. As temperature and humidity rise, cattle will require more water. Poor water quality, or lack of water, can cause cattle to go off feed quickly, which can limit feed intake and overall cattle performance.
  • Do not move a full bulk feeder. The feed may pack, which can compromise flow, especially if the feed is oily.
  • Clean feeder troughs regularly to remove any compromised product and help keep product fresh. When it rains, feed behind an adjustable gate can become wet, causing feed to swell, and preventing the flow of fresh feed. Removing wet feed will also prevent mold and rot.
  • For supplements with Intake Modifying Technology, consumption will adjust with changes in forage quantity and quality. Expect higher consumption with lower quality/quantity forage and lower consumption with higher quality/quantity forage. Be aware that in times of lower quality/quantity forage, cattle may consume supplements rapidly.

Here are some general rules of thumb by self-fed product:

Wind & Rain Storm Mineral:

  • Put fresh, non-medicated mineral out once per week.
  • Use a covered mineral feeder to help protect the mineral.
  • Know if your mineral is complete or non-complete. Complete minerals include salt, which helps drive intake.

Accuration Block or Tub Supplement:

  • In contrast to a plastic tub, blocks have corrugated cardboard sides. Initially, in smaller pastures, more than one big block can be placed in a feeding location. When consumption is determined, then the blocks can be relocated or separated.
  • Cows per block is a function of block size and pasture size.
    • 500 lb. block: One block per 20 to 25 cows
    • 200 lb. block: One block per 10 to 15 cows

Accuration Liquid Supplement:

  • All storage tanks and lick tanks must be cleaned prior to adding liquid.
  • At the end of the feeding season, tip tanks on their sides so the remaining liquid will flow out from the wheel slot. This prevents the remaining liquid from gelling, separating or molding inside the tank and keeps rainwater from entering the tank.
  • Accuration Liquid is a suspension product. Without agitation, it can become thicker over time, so it is important to move the liquid on a regular basis to maintain the free-flowing state. If forage quality is meeting cattle requirements and liquid intake is low, it is a good practice to move the lick wheels manually. That should be done weekly to keep the product from thickening in the tank.

 

Driving performance

No matter the product form, a self-fed supplement should not be approached with a “set it and forget it” strategy. “Small things like adjusting tub location and cleaning out a feeder can work together to help you achieve desired intake levels,” says Hayes. “And more desirable consumption can, potentially, lead to improved cattle performance.”

The extra time spent calculating supplement consumption and making adjustments may be well worth it.

 

Article Attributed to Purina Mills and Christina Hayes, Ph. D.

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