Archive for December, 2021

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Benefit Foaling Mares Before Rebreeding

Tuesday, December 21st, 2021

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Benefit Foaling Mares Before RebreedingOmega-3 Fatty Acids Benefit Foaling Mares Before Rebreeding: When compared to cows, ewes, and sows, mares experience a short interval between birth and their next heat cycle. After foaling, the uterus undergoes involution. Involution is a process that reduces uterine size, repairs uterine tissues, and restores the uterine environment to a nonpregnant state. Supporting uterine involution is critical. The 11-month gestation of the mare often makes it difficult to maintain every-year foaling. Commercial breeders prefer every-year foaling. In a recent study, researchers set out to determine the effects of feeding docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid, on uterine involution in the weeks after foaling.

Visit Kissimmee Valley Feed for Omega-rich horse products.

The Study:

The study used eighteen pregnant mares. The mares were assigned to one of two groups, a treatment group in which a microalgae rich in DHA was fed daily at 0.6 g/kg body weight or a control group. The treatment was fed from 90 days prior to the expected foaling date until seven days after first postpartum ovulation. Otherwise, the mares were fed similarly to maintain moderate to moderately fleshy body condition, including access to Bermudagrass pasture and a commercial concentrate at a rate of 1 kg/day (2.2 lb/day) before foaling and 2 kg/day (4.4 lb/day) after foaling.

Research ascertained reproductive health parameters. For example, through rectal palpation and ultrasonographic examination, including uterine and endometrium diameters, intrauterine fluid, uterine tone, and uterine echogenicity. Echogenicity measures the ability of a tissue to reflect an ultrasound wave.

Mares fed the DHA-rich supplement had smaller uterine horn diameters after foaling compared to control mares. Interestingly, DHA-fed mares had greater uterine echogenicity scores. Low echogenicity is generally related to increased estradiol. Estradiol induces edema and estrus behavior, so researchers expected lower scores as mares readied for rebreeding.

No treatment effects were observed for the other parameters evaluated.

Researchers concluded that “supplementation with DHA during peripartum may benefit uterine involution process and odds of early conception.”

“This research adds to the emerging volume of work that indicates omega-3 fatty acids, particularly DHA, is a useful nutritional supplement for broodmares,” explained Catherine Whitehouse, M.S., a nutritionist with Kentucky Equine Research. Studies in other species show omega-3s have beneficial effects on reproduction. For example, by modifying prostaglandin synthesis and metabolism, and by regulating genes integral to uterine function.

“The source of omega-3 fatty acids is important. Choose a high-quality supplement that delivers DHA directly, such as marine-derived EO-3,” Whitehouse advised.

Article Source: Kentucky Equine Research

New BAYDOG Service Dog Harnesses

Monday, December 20th, 2021
New BAYDOG Service Dog HarnessesStore #2 now offers BAYDOG Service Dog Harnesses!
BAYDOG’s harnesses are great to use when taking your dog on a hike or walk. The Service Dog Harness features 6 interchangeable patches which allow you to customize your harness and clearly communicate your dog’s service status. Sized small to extra large.
In  conclusion, visit Store #2 at 215 13th Street to see the New BAYDOG Service Dog Harnesses available.

New Year Resolutions for Pets

Monday, December 20th, 2021

New Year Resolutions for PetsNew Year Resolutions for Pets: Tips for enhancing animals’ lives and our own. That’s right, pets can have New Year’s Resolutions too!

With the New Year here, it’s time to take stock and make improvements in our lives and our pets’ lives. Here are some New Year Resolutions for Pets ideas and tips to hopefully enhance the health and add some fun to your pets’ lives.

Pets can suffer from overeating and lack of exercise just like humans. But there are more things to consider than diet and exercise when it comes to being a good example for our pets. Here are a few tips to help your pets be happier and healthier in 2022.

8 Tips:

    1. Exercise

      Firstly, regular exercise has the obvious health benefits, but it also is a great time to bond with our pets. A simple daily walk helps a dog learn proper manners. In addition, it provides some good quality time, and does wonders for the human counterpart, too! Keeping pets at the proper body weight reduces the risk of heart and joint problems, diabetes, and a host of other poor health conditions.

    2. Health Check Up

      Secondly, regular visit to your veterinarian is the best way to stay ahead of potential problems. Annual examinations of teeth, heart/lungs, and body condition overall will be less costly than waiting for a problem to develop and your pet suffering needlessly from complications of preventable problems. Having a good “baseline” of information about your pet also gives the veterinarian something to compare against and determine exactly what is wrong when something isn’t quite right with your pet.

    3. Good Nutrition

      Like humans, pets who eat poor quality food just do not have the health reserves that those that a good balanced diet. Poor skin, hair coat, muscle tone, and obesity problems can be a result of a poor diet. Also, pets are not humans — a diet rich in table scraps is not a healthy one, and can lead to problems such as obesity and pancreatitis.

    4. Good Grooming

      No one wants to be around a stinky pet. Regular grooming for example, bathing, toe nail clips, brushing teeth and hair coat, parasite control. As a result, it not only makes the pet more pleasing to be around, it is much healthier for the pet! For skin and coat problems that don’t resolve with regular grooming, please see your veterinarian. Above all, there may be an underlying medical condition affecting the skin, coat, or toenails.

    5. Safety

      Keeping pets safe is something most pet owners take for granted. However, take a moment to assess the toxic chemicals used in your house and yard. Are they necessary? Are all safety precautions followed? Where are household chemicals stored? Can your pet access these items? If toxins such as rodent poisons are used, can your pet access the rodents? Think too about enclosures for pets — is the fencing secure? Can your pet get caught or hooked up on the fence, a tree, etc. and choke or be stuck out in the weather when you are away?

    6. Information

      Being informed is the best way to keep track of our pet’s health and well-being. If possible, keep a medical log of your pet’s vet visits, medications, special needs, etc. to help keep track of your pet’s medical history. Knowing what is normal and not normal for your particular pet will assist your vet figure out what is wrong in the case of illness. For example, the Internet is a wealth of information. However, caution is advised. Especially when seeking out a diagnosis or medical assistance via the web. Just as in real life, there is good information and bad information out there. The only way to get an answer/diagnosis is through a thorough physical examination. In addition, a review of medical history, and possible lab work performed by your veterinarian.

    7. Love and Attention

      This is probably obvious, but too many pets are left outside in all kinds of weather, with very little human contact. Same goes for inside pets. For example, those who are largely ignored for lack of time and busy human schedules. Most importantly, take the time to focus on your pets and create/nourish that human-animal bond!

    8. Maintenance

      This refers to the more “unpleasant” aspects of pet care. For example, the litter box scooping, yard clean up, cage cleaning, and fish tank maintenance. A clean environment for our pets is a healthy one! Poor sanitation can lead to behavior problems (i.e. litter box avoidance) and health problems such as skin infections and the spread of communicable diseases.

In conclusion, visit Kissimmee Valley Feed for the best pet health supplies (and tell us your New Year Resolutions for Pets!)

Article Source: Janet Tobiassen Crosby, DVM, on About.com

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