Archive for June, 2018

Summer Car Heat Safety for your Pet

Thursday, June 28th, 2018

Heatstroke

You’ve heard of it, you knew it affected people, and you were even vaguely aware that it could affect your pet. But how does it happen? And most important, how can you help your pet avoid it? Heatstroke is a deadly disease that can kill your beloved companion, even with emergency treatment. The best way to avoid this terrible situation is prevention, and it’s all up to you.

Sun + humidity = heatstroke(and other factors that kill)

Everyone knows that the inside of a car on a hot summer’s day can be lethal. But Fido needs you to know more than that to keep him safe in the deadly sun. Days above 90 degrees, especially with high humidity, are inherently dangerous for your pet. Humidity interferes with animals’ ability to rid themselves of excess body heat. When we overheat we sweat, and when the sweat dries it takes excess heat with it. Our four-legged friends only perspire around their paws, which is not enough to cool the body. To rid themselves of excess heat, animals pant. Air moves through the nasal passages, which picks up excess heat from the body. As it is expelled through the mouth, the extra heat leaves along with it. Although this is a very efficient way to control body heat, it is severely limited in areas of high humidity or when the animal is in close quarters.

The shape of an animal’s nasal passages can contribute to an animal’s tendency to overheat. Brachiocephalic (pug-nosed) dogs are more prone to heatstroke because their nasal passages are smaller and it’s more difficult for them to circulate sufficient air for cooling. Overweight dogs are also more prone to overheating because their extra layers of fat act as insulation, which traps heat in their bodies and restricts their breathing capabilities. Age can also be a factor in an animal’s tendency to overheat–very young animals may not have a fully developed temperature regulating system, and older pets’ organ systems may not be functioning at 100 percent, leaving them prone to heat-related damage.

Cracking the windows doesn’t cut it

So where are the danger zones? The most obvious is your car: It can become a death trap even on a mild sunny day–and can insidiously raise the car’s temperature to well above 120 degrees! Never, ever leave your pet inside the car. If Fido can’t come with you when you get out of the car, leave him at home.

What are some other dangerous situations for your pets? Leaving animals outdoors without shelter is just as dangerous as leaving them inside a hot car. Be sure they are not left in a cage in the hot sun, on a chain in the backyard, or outdoors in a run without sufficient shade or air circulation.

Their lives are in your hands

Heatstroke is a medical emergency. If you suspect your pet has heatstroke, you must act quickly and calmly. Have someone call a veterinarian immediately. In the meantime, lower the animal’s body temperature by applying towels soaked in cool water to the hairless areas of the body. Often the pet will respond after only a few minutes of cooling, only to falter again with his temperature soaring back up or falling to well below what is normal. With this in mind, remember that it is imperative to get the animal to a veterinarian immediately. Once your pet is in the veterinarian’s care, treatment may include further cooling techniques, intravenous fluid therapy to counter shock, or medication to prevent or reverse brain damage.

Even with emergency treatment, heatstroke can be fatal. The best cure is prevention, and Fido and Fluffy are relying on you to keep them out of harm’s way. Summer does not have to be fraught with peril–with ample precaution, both you and your furry friends can enjoy those long, hot, dog-days of summer.

Signs of Heatstroke

  • Panting
  • Staring
  • Anxious expression
  • Refusal to obey commands
  • Warm, dry skin
  • High fever
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Vomiting
  • Collapse

Precautions to take if your pet lives outdoors

  • Ensure adequate shelter from sun/midday heat
  • Outdoor kennels should be well-ventilated and in the shade
  • Provide plenty of fresh water in a bowl that cannot be tipped over
  • Avoid excessive exercise on hot days
  • Talk with your local veterinarian to determine if your long-haired Fido needs a summer haircut

Source: American Animal Hospital Association

Save $8 Off Canidae Dog Food

Tuesday, June 26th, 2018
Jun ’18Jul
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Canidae Dog FoodFrom Monday, June 25th through Saturday, July 7th, take $8 OFF Canidae Dog Food products, including All Life Stages Chicken and Rice Dog Food (44 lbs.), All Life Stages Turkey Meal and Brown Rice Large Breed (44 lbs.), and All Life Stages Multi-Protein (44 lbs.).

Come by Kissimmee Valley Feed between Monday, June 25th, and Saturday, July 7th and take $8 OFF select Canidae dog food products. These products are filled with nutrients to keep your pup happy and healthy. You can learn more about each of the Canidae products on sale below.

We have a variety of pet food available, take a look at some of the other dog foods we have here. Come by Kissimmee Valley Feed over the next few days and save on Canidae products. Give us a call or stop by one of our store locations if you have any questions!

Grills Available at Kissimmee Valley Feed

Monday, June 25th, 2018

grills

Looking for a new grill this summer? Kissimmee Valley Feed has a variety of grills and grilling accessories for you to choose from! Kissimmee Valley Feed carries Kamodo Joe and Traeger grill products. See some of the products available below:

Take a look at our Outdoor Living website page to see all the grills and grilling accessories we have available. Come by Kissimmee Valley Feed this month and take a look at these products. Give us a call or stop by one of our store locations if you have any questions!

Self Serve Pet Wash Station

Monday, June 25th, 2018

Self serve pet wash stationLooking for a self serve pet wash station? Does your dog need a bath?

Come by Kissimmee Valley Feed and try out our climate-controlled self serve pet wash station.  BYOD (bring your own dog) or bring in your pets, large or small and make bath time simpler. Price is just $10 including shampoo, rinse, and blow-dry. Towels and gloves are provided too at no extra cost! To help prevent the wet doggie smell, take advantage of our self serve dryer. The grooming table allows you to brush out your dog or pet, so they are tangle-free. Best of all, we clean up the mess for you!

The pet wash station takes cash or credit cards and is available during business hours. If your pets need a wash, come see us! Also, take advantage of our new punch cards. Each time you stop in and utilize our self serve pet wash station, you will be credited for your visit. Once you fill up your card make sure you let an associate know and receive a special goodie! So beat the heat this summer and stop in for a washing session!

You’ll find Kissimmee Valley Feed pet wash station inside store number 2, 215 13th Street, St. Cloud, FL 34769. Phone: Phone: 407-892-4040.

Summer Pet Care

Friday, June 15th, 2018

When the lazy days of barbecues and swimming pools roll around, you can make them even better by sharing them with your favorite pet. By following a few summer pet safety tips, you can keep your animal friends healthy and enjoy the months of sun and fun.

  • Never leave your pet in the car. Though it may seem cool outside, the sun can raise the temperature inside your car to 120 degrees Fahrenheit in a matter of minutes, even with the windows rolled down. If you need to run some errands, leave the furry ones at home.
  • As you’re outside enjoying the warm weather, keep your pet leashed. It will keep her from getting lost, fighting other animals, and eating and drinking things that could make her sick. This tip isn’t just for dogs–even cats can learn to walk on a leash if you train them.
  • Water, water everywhere. Whether you’re indoors or out, both you and your pet need access to lots of fresh water during the summer, so check her water bowl several times a day to be sure it’s full. If you and your furry friend venture forth for the afternoon, bring plenty of water for both of you.
  • Pets need sunscreen too. Though all that fur helps protect her, your pet can get sunburned, particularly if she has light skin and hair. Sunburn in animals can cause problems similar to those it can cause in people, including pain, peeling, and skin cancer. So keep your pet out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and when you do go out, rub a bit of sunblock on unprotected areas like the tips of her ears, the skin around her lips, and the tip of her nose.
  • Say no to tangles. Keeping your pet well groomed will help her hair do what it was designed to do: protect her from the sun and insulate her from the heat. If she has extremely thick hair or a lot of mats and tangles, her fur may trap too much heat, so you may want to clip her.
  • Watch out for antifreeze. Hot weather may tempt your pet to drink from puddles in the street, which can contain antifreeze and other chemicals. Antifreeze has a sweet taste that animals like, but it’s extremely toxic. When you’re walking your pet, make sure she doesn’t sneak a drink from the street.
  • Be cautious on humid days. Humidity interferes with animals’ ability to rid themselves of excess body heat. When we overheat we sweat, and when the sweat dries it takes excess heat with it. Our four-legged friends only perspire around their paws, which is not enough to cool the body. To rid themselves of excess heat, animals pant. Air moves through the nasal passages, which picks up excess heat from the body. As it is expelled through the mouth, the extra heat leaves along with it. Although this is a very efficient way to control body heat, it is severely limited in areas of high humidity or when the animal is in close quarters.
  • Make sure your pet doesn’t overexert herself. Though exercise is an important part of keeping your dog or cat at a healthy weight, which helps her body stay cool, overdoing it can cause her to overheat. Keep the walks to a gentle pace and make sure they have plenty of water. If they are panting a lot or seems exhausted, it’s time to stop.
  • Take it easy on pets that can’t deal with the heat. Elderly, very young, and ill animals have a hard time regulating their body temperature, so make sure they stay cool and out of the sun on steamy summer days. Dogs with snub noses, such as Pekingese, pugs, and bulldogs, have a hard time staying cool because they can’t pant efficiently, so they also need to stay out of the heat. Overweight dogs are also more prone to overheating, because their extra layers of fat act as insulation, which traps heat in their bodies and restricts their breathing capabilities.
  • Bring them inside. Animals shouldn’t be left outside unsupervised on long, hot days, even in the shade. Shade can move throughout the afternoon, and pets can become ill quickly if they overheat, so keep them inside as much as possible. If you must leave your pet in the backyard, keep a close eye on her and bring her in when you can.
  • Keep an eye out for heatstroke. Heatstroke is a medical emergency. If you suspect your pet has heatstroke, you must act quickly and calmly. Have someone call a veterinarian immediately. In the meantime, lower the animal’s body temperature by applying towels soaked in cool water to the hairless areas of the body. Often the pet will respond after only a few minutes of cooling, only to falter again with his temperature soaring back up or falling to well below what is normal. With this in mind, remember that it is imperative to get the animal to a veterinarian immediately. Once your pet is in the veterinarian’s care, treatment may include further cooling techniques, intravenous fluid therapy to counter shock, or medication to prevent or reverse brain damage.

Even with emergency treatment, heatstroke can be fatal. The best cure is prevention, and Fido and Fluffy are relying on you to keep them out of harm’s way. Summer does not have to be fraught with peril–with ample precaution, both you and your furry friends can enjoy those long, hot dog-days of summer.

Signs of Heatstroke

  • Panting
  • Staring
  • Anxious expression
  • Refusal to obey commands
  • Warm, dry skin
  • High fever
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Vomiting
  • Collapse

Source: American Animal Hospital Association

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