Archive for November, 2021

Your Horse: Avoid Being Felled by Fall Founder

Monday, November 22nd, 2021

Avoid Being Felled by Fall FounderYour Horse: Avoid Being Felled by Fall Founder: If you’ve been involved with horses for any length of time, you’re no stranger to the anguish caused by laminitis. You may be aware of common causes of founder. For example: grain overload, endocrine disturbances, and overloading of supporting limbs, there’s one you may overlook: fall grazing.

Spring pastures contain high levels of sugar that can induce a bout of laminitis. However, a feeding frenzy in the fall could have the same effect.

Fall Founder:

“Some rain and a late-summer heatwave, especially after a long, dry summer, can cause pastures to have a growth spurt similar to what happens in the spring. These pastures can have high water-soluble carbohydrate levels, including both sugar and fructan, that may induce laminitis,” explained Catherine Whitehouse, M.S., a Kentucky Equine Research nutrition advisor. “Fall founder can also occur following the first frost.”

Cool-season forages such as tall fescue continue to grow late in the year, posing a risk for any horse or pony predisposed to developing laminitis. Further, cool-season grasses often experience a dramatic increase in sugar content after a frost.

“Grazing muzzles must be used for at-risk horses even in the fall to avoid pasture-associated laminitis,” Whitehouse said.

Management:

Using a research-proven buffer such as EquiShure will help minimize changes in hindgut pH, thereby stabilizing the intestinal microbiome.

Laminitis remains one of the most common reasons for euthanasia of horses. Above all, direct efforts at hoof health regardless of the season. One study* reports reasons related to euthanasia were attributed to disease stage, severity, and progression. For example, persistent lameness following a recent bout of laminitis commonly prompted owners to elect humane euthanasia.  A horse had a slow recovery from a laminitic episode. Some owners perceived their horses were at risk for future episodes and chose to euthanize.

“Owners were also more likely to elect humane euthanasia if slow recovery necessitated prolonged periods of time in a stall. Owners believed extended stall rest would negatively affect their horse’s psychological well-being and quality of life,” added Whitehouse.

Horses that have recovered from laminitis may benefit from a well-rounded hoof supplement. “Kentucky Equine Research offers high-quality products that include nutrients necessary for growth of strong, resilient hooves, such as biotin, zinc, methionine, and iodine,” shared Whitehouse.

In conclusion, do you have a specific question about your horse’s  health or diet? Visit Kissimmee Valley Feed today to check out our horse feed, hay and supplies!

Article Source: Kentucky Equine Research

*Pollard, D., C.E. Wylie, J.R. Newton, and K.L.P. Verheyen. 2020. Factors associated with euthanasia in horses and ponies enrolled in a laminitis cohort study in Great Britain. Preventative Veterinary Medicine 174:104833.

 

Holiday Safety Tips for Pets

Monday, November 22nd, 2021

Holiday Safety Tips for Pets: Cat next to a christmas tree The holiday season is just around the corner and many pet parents want to include the family pet in their holiday celebrations. As you get ready for all the festivities, it’s important to keep your pet’s exercise and eating schedule routine. Also, it’s important to steer pets clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants, and dangerous decorations. Our holiday safety tips for pets will get you and your pet ready for the holidays.

Holiday Plants and Decorations:

Christmas Trees – Be sure to secure and anchor your tree so it can’t tip over and fall. It’s also important to keep the tree water away from your pets because the fertilizers and bacteria in the water can cause major stomach upset and possibly diarrhea.

Mistletoe & Holly – Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested. Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.

Tinsel – Kittens love to play with tinsel because it’s sparkly and floaty. However, this so-called toy can be easily swallowed which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery.

Candles – Don’t leave lighted candles unattended because pets can easily burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to put out candles when you leave the room.

Wires, Batteries, and Glass Ornaments – Please keep wires, batteries, and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach. There are many dangers that can befall your pet while these holiday decorations are out for them to get into. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth and digestive tract.

Holiday Foods to Avoid

Sweet Treats – As you know chocolate is a big no-no for dogs. Please make sure all holiday treats that have chocolate or xylitol are kept away from your furry friend. Secure leftovers and garbage cans.

Leftovers – Do not feed your pets leftovers from your holiday meals. Obviously, they have pet food to satisfy their appetites. Olsen’s has lots of pet treats for your family pets.

Alcoholic Beverages – Christmas and especially New Years most likely will have beverages with alcohol that can be lethal to pets. Make sure to place your unattended alcoholic drinks where pets cannot get to them. If ingested, your pet could become weak, ill and may even go into a coma, possibly resulting in death from respiratory failure.

Fireworks – Just like fireworks during the Fourth of July celebrations, New Year’s is a time when noisy poppers, blowers, and loud noises are common while counting down to the new year. However, these noisy festivities can terrify your pets and possibly cause damage to their ears. Be sure to secure them in a safe, escape-proof area as midnight approaches.

These holiday safety tips for pets will help you enjoy the holidays. Visit Kissimmee Valley Feed to treat your pets this holiday season.

Tips for Raising Chickens in Winter

Friday, November 19th, 2021

Raising Chickens in WinterRaising chickens in winter can be a lot of fun. Some hens love wandering around the yard and their first snow sighting can be quite entertaining. A bird’s thick feathers are a natural protective coat. As a result, most breeds are well-equipped for winter.

Here are a few tips on how to care for chickens in the winter:

      1. How to keep chickens warm in winter:
        Do not add heat lamps. Chickens, especially cold-tolerant breeds, can withstand winter temperatures without supplemental heat. A chicken’s body temperature is around 106 degrees Fahrenheit, and they have their own protective layer of feathers to keep them warm.

        Most importantly, if you feel it is necessary to provide a source of heat, only provide enough heat to raise the temperature a few degrees. The hens will adjust to the cold temperature, but if it is 70 degrees Fahrenheit in the coop and 0 degrees Fahrenheit in the run, birds will not be able to regulate their body temperature.

      2. What to feed chickens in winter:
        A common myth is to feed oatmeal to birds in the winter. This is not a beneficial treat for chickens. Oats contain some types of fiber that chickens can’t digest which can cause the contents of the digestive tract to thicken. This leads to a reduction in the bird’s ability to digest and absorb nutrients. Greens are also unnecessary. Hens may pick at hay and spread it around, but they are not going to eat it.

        Feeding a complete layer feed like Purina® Layena®, Purina® Layena® Plus Omega-3 or Purina® Organic Pellets or Crumbles will provide the necessary nutrition hens need through the winter.

      3. Ensure feed and water isn’t frozen.
        Consider heated waterers. Feed and water birds more often when it’s below freezing. Energy needs increase in winter. Animals expend a considerable amount of energy to stay warm and will eat more feed. Complete layer feeds include all the energy hens need. The 90/10 rule still applies in winter.
      4. Allow exploration.
        Firstly, birds can tolerate snow, cold air and ice water. There is very little muscle in the lower part of bird legs and feet. Tendons control the movements. They stretch from the upper part of the legs down to the toes. Secondly, the blood entering the lower legs and feet are cooled by the blood returning to the heart. The blood going to the toes warms the blood returning. As a result, the tissue receives just enough heat to avoid frostbite while also being provided with enough oxygen to keep things functioning.
      5. Collect eggs more frequently.
        Temperatures below freezing result in frozen eggs. Moreover, as the egg freezes, the contents expand and will cause the egg to crack.
      6. Keep the chicken coop draft free.
        But don’t seal it completely. Some air needs to be exchanged to prevent ammonia build up. Open the top vent or higher windows slightly so fresh air can enter and stale air can exit.
      7. Keep the chicken coop dry.
        Remove any wet spots daily. Provide more bedding than you would in other seasons so birds have a place to burrow and stay cozy.
      8. Continue offering activities in the chicken coop.
        Hens will spend more time in the coop, so offer enrichment. For example, logs, sturdy branches or chicken swings can work well and place a Purina® Flock Block® supplement in the coop for a nutritious place to peck.

In conclusion, visit Kissimmee Valley Feed to treat your flock!

Article Source: Purina Mills

Ready to see the difference a complete feed can make in your flock? Sign up for Purina’s Feed Greatness® Challenge.

December Astro Sales

Thursday, November 18th, 2021

December Astro Sales cod crispsHead on over to Kissimmee Valley Feed Store #2 to take advantage of these December Astro Sales. Savings valid at our 215 13th Street St. Cloud, FL 34769 only. Stock up and save today! Please note the varying expiration dates.

The Honest Kitchen – FREE Treat:
December 2021

Buy any two bags of our Cookies, Cod Crisps, Ocean Chews, and Purely One Fish Treats, Get 1 bag FREE!

Redbarn – 5.00 OFF
August – December 2021

Get $5.00 OFF all CHEW-A-BULLS Dental Treat Bags

NaturVet – $2.00 Dollars OFF
December  2021

Get $2.00 OFF all NaturVet Products (Limit 6 per customer)

December Astro Loyalty Sales are valid at our 13th Street, St. Cloud location only, while supplies last.

Kamado Joe and Traeger Grills on Clearance

Thursday, November 18th, 2021

Grills on ClearanceKamado Joe and Traeger Grills are on Clearance as well as the brand’s grilling accessories! Kissimmee Valley Feed’s Second Store, located at 215 13th Street, St. Cloud, FL 34769, is hosting this deal. Head on over to that location and check out the grills and accessories on clearance.

To get a good idea of the product selection, click here.

 

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